Clipping services
There are a number of various "clips" you can go for and most will depend on which suit your circumstances and the nature of the work your horse will be required to do.

Clipping off more coat than required is considered a bad management, apart from which it will cost you a more in extra feed, hay, bedding and rugs to keep the animal comfortable. So spend some time "contemplating" before choosing a type of clip for your horse.

Bib Clip

Bib clip

Consists of removing the coat from the underside of the neck down in front of the chest. A good clip for horses and ponies, which are living out through the winter but which may be used for the odd hack at weekends or during an occasional light evening. Useful for the stabled horse that feels the cold or in light work. It is still necessary to rug up field kept or stabled horses.

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Neck and Belly Clip + removal of top of leg

Neck andbelly + top of the leg

Same as above but in addition an area on the top of the front legs is removed.

Neck and Belly Clip

Neck and belly

 

A good clip for horses and ponies, which are living out through the winter but which may be used for the odd hack at weekends or during an occasional light evening. Useful for the stabled horse that feels the cold or in light work. It is still necessary to rug up field kept or stabled horses.

Apron Clip

Apron clip

Here additional coat is taken off to the girth line between the front legs and the top of the forelegs. A good clip for horses and ponies, which are living out through the winter but which may be used for the odd hack at weekends or during an occasional light evening. Useful for the stabled horse that feels the cold or in light work. It is still necessary to rug up field kept or stabled horses.

Irish Clip

Irish clip

Similar to the neck and belly clip, but more of the hair on the chest, belly and shoulders is removed to leave a "triangle" effect. A good type of clip for those horses which are required to do more work than as described in the "neck and belly" clip, but which are not worked to a point, requiring a more severe clip. This clip may include the removal of hair from the lower part of the face, but would normally finish at the jowl to become Irish Clip + half head removed.

Low trace Clip

Low trace clip

As the name suggests this type of clip originates from the old harness horses. Popular clip for many riding horses. Very good type of clip for field kept and stabled horses who have a tendency to sweat when exercised, but which are not really doing any hard work, hunting or competing.

The coat is removed from the underside of the neck and belly, between the forelegs and the upper part of the hind legs. If required the lower portion of the face can be clipped off. (A good guide to your line off the belly is to put the saddle on and measure about 16/18cm from the bottom of the saddle flap) Always rug up to compensate for loss of coat.

Medium trace clip

Medium trace clip

A very similar style to the low trace clip except that more of the coat is removed (a higher bodyline is clipped) and half of the face is often clipped as well. Caution should be taken with this clip if it is intended that the horse should live outside (in which case leave the face unclipped) and some type of field shelter must be provided. If stabled, clip the whole or half of the head out, as it will give a neater appearance. If electing for a half head clip your line should follow the path of the cheek pieces down the face. When clipping off heads remember this is an area, which exposes the horse to a considerable loss of heat because of the thin skin covering over the bone structure. Not really advisable unless your stabling is sheltered and certainly not suitable for those in really exposed parts of the Country.

As a guide your clip height line should be around a point just below the bottom of the saddle.

High trace clip

High trace clip

 

The clip for horses that are fully stabled and are just turned out for a few hours daily. Selected for those horses that are in steady work with the occasional requirement to undertake some fast work or for those entered in competitions through the winter months. As a guide your clip height line should be set to a point about 12cm above the bottom of the saddle. Rugs are the order of the day with extra rugs or blankets if the weather get bad. Heads subject to conditions as previously discussed.

Chaser clip

Chaser clip

Popular clip for use on the steeplechasers, as the name implies. A clip for those horse which are active in competition work or racing. Pretty much the same as the blanket clip except that you don't remove hair from the upper part of the neck, and clipping stops just behind the ears, as this will help to keep warmth in the muscles of this area. Clip out the coat from the head, lower parts of the neck, chest, belly and upper portions of the hind legs. The usual finishing line is normally just above that of the blanket clip. Keep an eye on condition; a warm stable with plenty of rugs and blankets to combat bad weather periods is essential.

Blanket clip

Blanket clip

A clip suitable only for horses which are stabled and are in medium to hard work and or competition work. All the coat is removed except for a "blanket" area over the hind quarters and saddle area. As a guide the clip line is normally judged to be the level of the bottom of the saddle flaps but this can vary. Heads are normally clipped out, but you can opt for half the face or even leave the entire head complete. Whatever you elect to do, you should take into account conditions as previously mentioned in the "Medium trace clip" If you turn out during the day a neck cover might be appreciated by your horse, - this is an area which suffers a fair amount of heat loss. As always a keen eye on condition, a warm stable with plenty of rugs and blankets to combat bad weather periods is essential.

Hunter clip

Hunter clip

A smart clip, but only for the horse who is really working hard, competing and hunting regularly. It's all off! Except for a small area of mane, the saddle area, the legs and a small "v" shape is left above the tail. Horse which have undergone this degree of clipping need a warm stable, good food, and suitably rugged. Daily turnout for a few hours but only with a NZ on and an extra blanket underneath and neck cover is really necessary even in mild conditions. Use an exercise rug when out exercising.

Full clip

Full clip

Away with the lot! Keep only the mane, forelock and tail. Some horses are given a full clip in the autumn with a different style being adopted at the point of the second clip (hunter or trace clip for example) The idea is that this will give added insulation compared to a full clip but leave a shorter coat length. Stable bandages are needed to protect the legs from cold.

This clip is intended for horses in hard fast competition work, racing and hunting regularly. Turn out should be restricted to short periods on fine and mild days during the better daylight hours and they should be well covered with several warm rugs and the added use of a neck cover. An exercise rug is needed when out exercising. Could be a useful clip for those considering some of the early spring events and shows in order to get a nice short coat

Trimming the head and ears.

The look of a good head can be accentuated, whilst at the same time the lines of a poor head can be greatly improved by trimming the long hairs which grow on a horse’s jaw, the muzzle and the ears.

The Muzzle is to many a matter of preference. Some trim completely, others leave the area. If you elect to trim use scissors. Do not attempt to trim the whiskers around the eyes. Horses can have their eye badly injured!

Ears have hair growth inside designed to act as a barrier against insects and draughts. Do not attempt to clip away these hairs, but you can trim those hairs, which are on outer edge of the ears to add to the shape. Work on ears requires a gentle and careful approach, and the help of an assistant will often be useful. Certain horses may be more relaxed if they are not able to see you working on their ears. This can be achieved by cupping the eyes with ones hand (your assistant’s hands!) over the horse’s eyes.

Trimming legs will greatly improve the look of your horse. Avoid cutting deeply into the coat in isolated places, as it will have the effect of creating “steps” which give a very ugly appearance. Aim for a “natural” look. Horses, which compete in winter, should have neat clean legs. Legs, which have not been trimmed, may be more prone to mud-fever, equally untrimmed legs make the task of spotting cuts and wounds more difficult. Horses and ponies, which winter outside may benefit from having their legs left in a “hairy” state because in wet conditions water will drain down the long hair to the ground thus protecting the soft and flexible areas of the pastern and heels which remain dry.

 

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